Good jobs

Where did the good jobs go? There is a lot of talk these days from our political representatives, including the President, about creating more jobs and preserving jobs for Americans. They seem to understand that getting Americans back to work will stimulate the American economy. They seem to feel that it will help to give the owners of small businesses some tax credits and other financial benefits so that they will be able to hire more workers and getting more American workers engaged in the businesses of keeping America “green”. But I don’t think that it is the owners of small businesses who have laid off the vast numbers of workers who are unemployed, and I think that the workers that might be used in keeping America “green” will not be enough to put millions of Americans back to work.

I think that the big layoffs have been in the manufacturing and construction segments of American business. Americans are not making as much as they use to make, and many of the making aspects of what American companies produce and market have been outsourced to foreign companies or foreign divisions of American manufacturers.

I don’t think that the big problem of unemployed Americans will be solved until we bring these jobs back to American factories. It is time for Americans to return to making clothes, shoes, toys, appliances, and other commodities and working in the vegetable fields and fruit orchards of our country. It doesn’t make much sense to me for some major business executives to expect Americans to be able to buy their products when they are unwilling to pay them American wages to make them.

“Cheap” clothing and other commodities and tax incentives and credit and bailouts cannot be a good foundation for American businesses and good jobs for Americans.

Americans used to have a lot of pride in the label that said “Made in America”. I think that this should be the basis for good jobs for Americans. What Americans make is what Americans can sell, and what Americans sell is what gives Americans enough profits to engage in the world’s markets, but a good day’s work in a good dependable job is the personal foundation for participation in this process. What do you think? Let’s talk about what is a good job for Americans and where are they going to find one.


Comments

Good jobs — 10 Comments

  1. That is OK. I don’t expect everyone to agree with me. I invite you to continue this discussion. Let’s talk about “what is a good job for Americans and where are they going to find one”.

  2. I have got to come to an agreement together with the above commenter, the truth of the matter that information and advice such as you present is now widely avaliable does suggest we all find ourselves that much more empowered in comparison with a couple of years previously.

  3. This may be a little outside of the good job catagory, but I think that the goverment set up the health care bill to get more people covered that don’t have insurance. they expected small business companies to provide this insurance coverage for their employees. The problem is that small businesses can’t afford the insurance they need to pay for for the employees they already have and so have to let some of them go, and the government issued the stimulus bill to provide for jobs that would be paid for by a tax increase for everybody making over $250,000.00. This would include almost every small business. How does that work out to create more jobs? I don’t see how it can work. The stimulus bill created a number of jobs, but not in the places that they were needed and companies had to lay off more people than new job took the place off and you read in the papers now that more and more companies are laying off hundreds and thousands of people and unemployment figures continue to rise. People are saving their money and not spending it or only buying what they need to get by month by month. the financial situation of the world doesn’t look very good right at this momemt, but hopefully it will get better. Maybe I am way off base with this comment, but I just thought I would reply and see what you thought. Dick Sherbondy

    • Dick, These problems of health care and unemployment and insurance and taxes and small businesses and government action are all related. And there are no simple “fixes” to these problems. Insurance is a business that has to function with “profits”. Jobs always have to be provided by individuals or groups of individuals who can afford to hire more workers to produce and to distribute the products or services that they have to offer to the world, irregardless of whether they are “private” or “governmental”. The market system of the US and that of other major financial players in the world has become disabled by efforts of many to manipulate its processes to their own advantage, so it is not working efficiently right now. And I don’t think that those who are in control or who are in positions to apply a lot of force to what it will take to fix these problems are willing to take the necessary steps to do so. They are not willing to make the necessary personal sacrifices. See my posts regarding “good health care” and “good business” or “what is the common good?” They can be seen here: http://christianityetc.org/blog/good-health-care , http://christianityetc.org/blog/good-business , http://christianityetc.org/blog/what-is-the-common-good Thanks for your comment.

    • I do read about this matter every day and hear about it all of the time from various news commentators. I’ve had a lot of personal experience with job loses and job searches Several of my personal relatives are struggling with job issues in their lives, and three of my neighbors who are skilled union craftsmen are out of work. So what do you think is a good job these days? Where are people going to find one? Why are some college graduates unable to get jobs in the fields in which they have been educated? I would like to see your personal insights regarding this matter.

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